Conflict between the U.S. northern and southern states, which seceded to form the Confederacy

Reference

American Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"The American Civil War (1861-1865) was a bitter sectional conflict that began after southern states of the United States declared their secession from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America. The United States did not recognize any right of secession, and fighting began after the Confederacy used force to seize U.S. federal property within its boundaries. After a fairly quiet first year, three very bloody years of fighting ended with a decisive Union victory, followed by a period of Reconstruction. The war produced more than 970,000 casualties (3 percent of the population), including approximately 620,000 soldier deaths. The causes of the war, the reasons for the outcome, and even the name of the war itself, are subjects of much controversy, even today. ..."

Articles

Gone With the Wind: An American Epic, by Donald W. Miller, Jr., MD, 17 Apr 2007
Review of Margaret Mitchell's book with some commentary on the film
"Between 1823 and 1888, every country in the New World that had slaves, such as Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, ..., freed them peacefully - except Haiti (in 1804) and the United States, who did it through war. The Confederate States of America would have freed their slaves peacefully fairly soon after it became a nation had it not been attacked and destroyed by the Union."
Related Topic: Gone With the Wind
Abraham Lincoln: 2 assessments: Taking the gloss off of the Great Emancipator, by Jeffrey Rogers Hummel, Chicago Tribune, 12 Feb 2009
Examines Lincoln's attitude toward the abolition of slavery as well as the effects of his war on the growth of government
"Beyond its horrendous cost in lives and money, the Civil War brought about a dramatic surge in the size, scope and intrusiveness of government. ... The war occasioned protectionist tariffs, a vast array of internal excise taxes and the country's first national income tax. The national debt climbed from a modest $65 million to $2.8 billion."
Related Topic: Abraham Lincoln
America's Two Just Wars: 1775 and 1861, by Murray N. Rothbard, The Costs of War, May 1994
Based on a talk given at the Mises Institute's Costs of War conference, published in The Costs of War: America's Pyrrhic Victories, John V. Denson (editor)
"We remember the care with which the civilized nations had developed classical international law. Above all, civilians must not be targeted; wars must be limited. But the North insisted on creating a conscript army, a nation in arms, and broke the 19th-century rules of war by specifically plundering and slaughtering civilians ... Sherman's infamous March through Georgia was one of the great war crimes, and crimes against humanity, of the past century-and-a-half."
Benjamin Tucker, Individualism, & Liberty: Not the Daughter but the Mother of Order, by Wendy McElroy, Literature of Liberty, 1981
Bibliographical essay covering the people and radical movements that influenced Tucker in his founding and publishing of Liberty, its major themes and contributors
"True to the maxim 'War is the Health of the State,' the Civil War was nearly the death of individualist libertarianism. The rampant growth of government caused by the War and its aftermath established an environment hostile to individual rights. ... The War ushered in conscription, suspension of habeas corpus, censorship, military law, political prisoners, legal tender legislation, and soaring taxes and tariffs. The status and functions of government inflated as never before. Equally important, the prevailing view of government changed."
Emergencies: The Breeding Ground of Tyranny, by William L. Anderson, Future of Freedom, Nov 2006
Examines the long history of "emergency powers" claimed by U.S. Presidents, including recent examples such as sanctions stemming from the International Economic Powers Act and the so-called War on Terror
"None of the first seven states that announced secession from the United States bordered the nation's capital, and neither they nor the states that later joined the Confederate States of America ever called for an invasion of the United States. ... After the Fort Sumter incident of April 1861, Lincoln announced his intention of invading the Confederate states, an action that triggered the secession of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas."
Is Any War Civil?, by Sheldon Richman, 4 Dec 2001
Considers the controversy over whether Iraq was engaged in a civil war in 2006, and Tony Snow's comment contrasting the situation with the American 1861-1865 conflict
"Although that conflict is called the Civil War, in fact it does not satisfy Snow's definition. ... Northerners and Southerners were not fighting over who would control the government of the United States. Eleven southern states had tried to leave the Union and become their own country, the Confederate States of America. President Lincoln declared the secession illegal and went to war to prevent it."
Related Topic: Iraq War (2003)
Les Economistes Libertaires, by Carl Watner, Reason, Jan 1977
Discusses the French economists of the 19th century and in particular Gustave de Molinari and his thoughts on the provision of security and defense services by private agencies
"The principle of secession was exemplified by the South's position in the American Civil War. In L'Économiste Belge, Molinari declared himself in favor of the South's position. Secession from an existing political state was, for Molinari, nothing other than the principle of free exchange transported to the political sphere. Although he distinctly decried the advocacy of slavery, Molinari thought the North's position was equally compromised by its failure to allow the South to secede and by maintaining protectionist tariffs."
Lysander Spooner (1808-1887) and Foreign Policy: Spooner's Real Views About Everything, by Joseph R. Stromberg, 8 May 2000
Begins wih biographical summary and then delves into Spooner's views on slavery, the U.S. Constitution and the War Between the States
"Spooner had been such a radical abolitionist that he busied himself with schemes to make 'private war' against the slaveholders of the South. Yet, when the war came, he joined that minority of abolitionists who did not support it. Spooner's lack of trust in government had so far matured that he felt morally bound to oppose organized state war, whatever its alleged purposes. In any case, Spooner did not accept that the war had been fought 'to free the slaves.'"
The Federal War on Gold, Part 2, by Jacob G. Hornberger, Future of Freedom, Sep 2006
Continues with the brief monetary history of the United States, discussing Abraham Lincoln's war loans and legal tender law, and the Supreme Court cases of Hepburn v. Griswold and Knox v. Lee
"In 1862, Congress granted Lincoln's request to issue $150 million in Treasury notes to finance the war effort during the War Between the States. In simple terms, the federal government was borrowing money, and the money it was borrowing was the gold and silver coins that had been established as the legal money under the Constitution. ... When the notes came due, the Treasury would have to repay the lender in money — that is, in gold coins."
The Progressive Era, Part 1: The Myth and the Reality, by William L. Anderson, Future of Freedom, Feb 2006
"When war broke out between North and South in 1861, the Unitarians were among the most forceful in calling for the complete destruction of the South, and while their influence on the actual fields of battle was negligible, they were highly influential on the political home front."
Warring as Lying Throughout American History, by James Bovard, Future of Freedom, Feb 2008
Recounts how U.S. Presidents and their administrations since James Polk have lied about wars, from start to finish
"Though Polk refused to provide any details of where the attack occurred, the accusation swayed enough members of Congress to declare war against Mexico. Congressman Abraham Lincoln vigorously attacked Polk for his deceits. But Lincoln may have studied Polk's methods, since they helped him whip up war fever 15 years later."

Books

When in the Course of Human Events: Arguing the Case for Southern Secession
    by Charles W. Adams, 2000
The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
    by Thomas J. DiLorenzo, Walter E. Williams (Foreword), 2002
Related Topic: Abraham Lincoln

Videos

HOWARD ZINN: "Holy Wars", by Howard Zinn, Democracy Now!, 11 Nov 2009
Talk given at Boston University, discussing the American "Holy Wars": the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and World War II

Podcasts

Lincoln's War, by John V. Denson, The Lew Rockwell Show, 7 Aug 2008
John Denson and Lew discuss how Lincoln managed to get the South to "fire the first shot"