Opposition to statist and authoritarian forces using protests, non-cooperation and other nonviolent methods
  • Hacktivism - Use of computers and networks to protest or to assist with other acts of resistance
Gandhi

Reference

Nonviolent resistance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Nonviolent resistance (or nonviolent action) is the practice of achieving goals through symbolic protests, civil disobedience, economic or political noncooperation, and other methods, without using violence. It is largely synonymous with civil resistance. Each of these terms ('nonviolent resistance' and 'civil resistance') has its distinct merits and also slightly different connotations ... The modern form of non-violent resistance was popularised and proven to be effective by the Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi in his efforts to gain independence from the British. ..."

Articles

Without Firing A Single Shot: Voluntaryist Resistance and Societal Defense [PDF], by Carl Watner, The Voluntaryist, 2006
Comprehensive historical review of nonviolent means of defending a society from foreign forces
"The term 'people power' is part of a surprisingly long and robust tradition of waging social conflict by nonviolent means. ... Those who have studied the history of nonviolent movements have cataloged a surprisingly long list of examples, often beginning with the American colonial boycotts, tax refusal, and acts of civil disobedience ..."
Give Me Liberty, by Rose Wilder Lane, 1936
Originally published as an article titled "Credo" in the Saturday Evening Post; describes her experiences in and history of Soviet Russia and Europe, contrasting them with the history of the United States, emphasizing the individualist themes
"They are a printer in Texas, who printed a letter that twenty million Americans have read, though it appeared in no newspaper; the farmer in Nebraska who refused to pay a fine for raising wheat and went to jail 'for the principle'; ... the employer in Ohio who spends his fortune and stakes the existence of his business in resistance to the Federal tyranny that would force him to reduce the wages he pays; the hundreds of thousands of men and women in all these states who are aroused and acting in defense of their rights."
Henry David Thoreau and "Civil Disobedience," Part 3, by Wendy McElroy, Future of Freedom, May 2005
Further examination of themes in "Civil Disobedience", including unjust laws, politicians and reformers, voting, when to resist the state and the influence on Gandhi
"The book profoundly influenced a young lawyer in South Africa who was protesting that government's treatment of immigrant workers from India. The lawyer was Mohandas K. Gandhi. Gandhi found in Thoreau the techniques he would use in the subsequent struggle for Indian independence. ... By embracing Thoreau's message and by expanding the strategy of civil disobedience, Gandhi focused world attention on the shy Yankee philosopher who lived without real fame in his own nation, in his own time."
The Colonial Venture of Ireland, Part 2, by Wendy McElroy, Future of Freedom, Jun 2004
Historical account of Ireland from 1840 to the early years of the twentieth century, including the Young Irelanders, the famines, the Irish in North America, Captain Boycott, the demand for home rule, the Gaelic League and the emergence of Sinn Fein
"It quickly became a mass movement aimed at breaking 'landlordism' by refusing to pay rent and through militant acts — the most famous of which was directed against Capt. Charles C. Boycott. Captain Boycott was an estate agent who ordered evictions. In protest, all farmhands and servants refused to labor on the Boycott estate. Shopkeepers refused to supply his household. Policemen had to deliver his mail. In despair, Boycott resigned and retired to England."
The Politics of Étienne de La Boétie, by Murray N. Rothbard, 1975
Introduction to the 1975 edition of The Politics of Obedience: The Discourse of Voluntary Servitude, translated by Harry Kurz; summarises the key insights of La Boétie's work
"La Boétie's celebrated and creatively original call for civil disobedience, for mass nonviolent resistance as a method for the overthrow of tyranny, stems directly from the above two premises: the fact that all rule rests on the consent of the subject masses and the great value of natural liberty. For if tyranny really rests on mass consent, then the obvious means for its overthrow is simply by mass withdrawal of that consent."
The Secret State, by Carl Oglesby, 19 Dec 1991
Details various events from the establishment of the Gehlen Org after World War II to the 1991 death of Danny Casolaro that Oglesby says led to the creation of "a national-security oligarchy, a secret and invisible state within the public state"
"The assassinations of King and the second Kennedy were body blows to the civil rights and the antiwar movements and drove nails in the coffins of those who were still committed to the principles of democratic nonviolent struggle. From now on there would be virtually nothing left of the organized movement except the Black Panthers and the Weathermen, both committed to violence and thus both of them doomed."
Thoreau and "Resistance to Civil Government", by Gary M. Galles, Mises Daily, 19 Sep 2002
Presents several excerpts from "Resistance to Civil Government" together with a short introduction and concluding reflexion
"While far less known than Walden, 'Civil Disobedience' has arguably had much farther reaching effects. It helped inspire the Danish resistance in World War II, Gandhi in India, and tax resistors and civic protestors of all types for many decades. And it still has much to say to us today ..."
Related Topic: Henry David Thoreau

Videos


George H. Smith on the Moral Right to Resist Authority, by George H. Smith, 1996
Talk given at conference of the International Society of Individual Liberty