Laws that grant monopoly rights on intellectual creations, such as patents and copyrights

Reference

Intellectual property - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Intellectual property (IP) is a legal concept which refers to creations of the mind for which exclusive rights are recognized. Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. Common types of intellectual property rights include copyright, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights, trade dress, and in some jurisdictions trade secrets. Although many of the legal principles governing intellectual property rights have evolved over centuries, it was not until the 19th century that the term intellectual property began to be used, and not until the late 20th century that it became commonplace in the majority of the world. ..."

Articles

Intellectual Property Fosters Corporate Concentration, by Sheldon Richman, 10 Jan 2014
After describing and providing references on the case against IP laws, reviews Butler Shaffer's monograph "A Libertarian Critique of Intellectual Property"
"In contrast, 'rights' in ideas — patents and copyrights — were government monopoly grants having nothing in common with the notion of property at the heart of libertarianism. In fact, such artificial rights undermine genuine property by authorizing IP holders to enlist government power to stop other people from using their justly acquired resources and ideas."
Monopoly and Aggression, by Sheldon Richman, 19 Dec 2014
Argues that monopoly and aggression are intimately related and that IP laws are currently the main monopolistic interventions
"Intellectual-property laws — patents, copyrights, and the like — have a similar effect by hampering competition through prohibitions on the use of knowledge and forms that people possess mentally. The creation of an artificial property right through patents is practically indistinguishable from a franchise or license. Its harm to consumers is the same. ... So-called intellectual property is the dominant engine of monopoly in modern economies."
Related Topic: Monopoly
Sweatshops the "Best Available Alternative"? But Who Decides What Alternatives are Available?, by Kevin Carson, 20 May 2013
Criticises Benjamin Powell's defense of Bangladesh garment sweatshops
"Thanks to international trademark and patent law, Nike and a few other companies are the only game in town when it comes to hiring people to make shoes. They can take Nike's price or leave it. But there's lots of competing sweatshops, and Nike can easily take its business elsewhere. ... And the same 'intellectual property' gives them oligopoly pricing power in the United States to sell the sneakers at a retail price thousands of percent above the actual cost of production."
Related Topic: Bangladesh
Benjamin Ricketson Tucker, Part 2, by Wendy McElroy, Future of Freedom, Sep 2007
Biographical essay on Benjamin Tucker from the first issue of Liberty until his death
"In only one area did Tucker flatly reject Spooner: intellectual property. Copyright and patents was one of several lengthy debates that Tucker conducted in Liberty, which became a testing ground for shaping radical individualist theory. Tucker rejected ownership in ideas except as it arose from an explicit contract between individuals; later libertarians called this concept 'free-market copyright and patents.'"
John Gilmore on inflight activism, spam and sarongs, by Mikael Pawlo, GrepLaw, 18 Aug 2004
Topics discussed include: terrorism, the drug war, encryption, censorship, spam, the end-to-end principle, the right to travel, anonymity, secret FAA/TSA rules, blogs, copy protection, free software and the EFF
"The way I found to make money from unlimited cheap/free distribution of perfect copies was to go with the flow rather than fighting it. Encourage the world to distribute your work to every person on earth; then every person on earth becomes your potential customer. Build a commercial relationship with people who depend on your work; they won't care if the rest of the world can have it, as long as they get your attention so it meets THEIR needs."
Rights Violations Aren't the Only Bads, by Sheldon Richman, 17 Jan 2014
Discusses criticism of "Intellectual Property Fosters Corporate Concentration" in the larger context of rights violations
"One who rejects the legitimacy of intellectual property can still have perfectly good moral grounds for objecting to the plagiarist's or adulterator's misconduct. ... If someone attaches his name to something I wrote, the plagiarist's declaration that he is not a thief (because expressions of ideas cannot be owned) is hardly germane. I would not accuse him of being a thief. Rather, I'd accuse him of being a fake — of pretending to have accomplished something he in fact did not accomplish."
Related Topic: Libertarianism
Socialized Medicine in a Wealthy Country, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., Mises Daily, 2 Dec 2006
Discusses the view of socialised medicine held by left-socialists, examining the problems that existed in Soviet-controlled countries as well as current U.S. problems, and urges for a "complete separation of health and state"
"In this context, too, we need to raise the subject of medical patents, which are nothing but government privileges given to an innovative company to prolong the period of profits that come from being the first firm to gain approval for the drug. ... The high profits flowing to pharmaceutical companies from patents, combined with increasing government subsidies, have led to an untenable situation."
The Many Monopolies, by Charles W. Johnson, 24 Aug 2011
Describes four ways in which markets are distorted by government interventions, explains Tucker's "Four Monopolies", examines five present-day monopolies and discusses Tucker's libertarian views
"Since copying an idea does not deprive the inventor of the idea, or any tangible property she had before, 'intellectual property' meant only a legal monopoly against competitors who could imitate or duplicate the monopolists' products at lower cost. 'Intellectual property' (IP) has grown vigorously since 1888, as media, technology, and scientific innovation made control over the information economy a linchpin of corporate power. Monopoly profits on IP are the effective business model of Fortune 500 companies ..."

Cartoons and Comic Strips

Bipedalism, by Tom Thaves (Thaves), 12 Jan 2015
Does "worldly goods" include intellectual property?, by Tom Thaves (Thaves), Frank and Ernest, 25 Apr 2015
Due to copyright violation ..., by Parker and Hart, The Wizard of Id, 12 Jun 2015

Videos


Copyright is Brain Damage, by Nina Paley, 21 Oct 2015
Presentation given at TEDxMaastricht; describes the copyright issues Paley had with Sita Sings the Blues, how some information can come in to someone's mind but it can't come out and what she is doing for her new feature film

Charles "Rad Geek" Johnson chats it up with MHD about Agorism, by Charles W. Johnson, The Motorhome Diaries
Johnson explains agorism and counter-economics, including an example relating to intellectual property (at 1:20)
Related Topic: Agorism