Liberty to practice any or no religion

Reference

Amendment I to the U.S. Constitution
"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. ..."

Articles

A Letter Concerning Toleration, by John Locke, 1689
Originally "Epistolia de Tolerentia", translated by William Popple
"First, Because the Care of Souls is not committed to the Civil Magistrate any more than to other Men. It is not committed unto him, I say, by God; because it appears not that God has ever given any such Authority to one Man over another, as to compell any one to his Religion. Nor can any such Power be vested in the Magistrate by the Consent of the People; because no man can so far abandon the care of his own Salvation, as blindly to leave it to the choice of any other, whether Prince or Subject, to prescribe to him what Faith or Worship he shall embrace."
Don't Fund Religious Groups, by Sheldon Richman, Jun 2001
Argues against President George W. Bush's proposal to give taxpayers' money to religious organizations
"He heaps high praise on those groups. But has it occurred to him that their success may have something to do to with their distance from government? Yet he proposes to close that distance. We already know what happens when private groups get too close to government. They lose their autonomy. ... Moreover, there is no way that the program can avoid funding religion — which is anathema in a free society. The Bush folks assure us the money won't be used this way, but they are being disingenuous."
Dump the Contraception Mandate and All the Rest, by Sheldon Richman, 3 Jan 2014
Questions advocates of mandating employers to pay for "insurance" coverage of contraceptives
"It is the government's decree — not the employers who object to it — that violates religious liberty. Those who favor the mandate say repeatedly that employers who would refuse to pay for their employees' contraceptives because of religious scruples would be denying women access to contraception. That is obviously a lie, sheer demagogy. No woman would be prohibited from obtaining contraceptive products because her employer refused to pay."
Michiganistan?, by Leon Drolet, Liberty, Jun 2003
"Why do some U.S. states join Islamic theocracies in having draconian laws against private, adult, consensual sex acts? ... When Jesus told the Pharisees to separate that belonging to God from that belonging to the state, he introduced for the first time the concept of a separation of the interests of religion and government."
Related Topic: Michigan
Religion and Freedom, by Rev. Robert A. Sirico, Future of Freedom, Dec 1993
Religion and the Constitution, by Thomas Sowell, 28 Jun 2002
Should Government Run Churches ... or Schools?, by Scott McPherson, 27 Dec 2002
Benjamin Tucker, Individualism, & Liberty: Not the Daughter but the Mother of Order, by Wendy McElroy, Literature of Liberty, 1981
Bibliographical essay covering the people and radical movements that influenced Tucker in his founding and publishing of Liberty, its major themes and contributors
"Freethought was probably the first radical influence in Tucker's life. Born, as previously mentioned, of a Quaker father and a radical Unitarian mother, he was raised in New Bedford, Massachusetts, then a center of Quakerism and religious dissent. In this atmosphere of religious freedom, Tucker clearly recalled '"sitting steadily under the radical preaching" of the Reverend Mr. Potter, who rejected all dogmatic authority, whether of church organizations, scriptures, or creeds, and asserted individual freedom of belief.'"
John Locke's Top 5 Radical Political Ideas, by Brandon Turner, 29 Aug 2016
Brief discussion of "five features of Locke's political thought that remain particularly important": natural equality, property, consent, resistance and toleration
"In A Letter Concerning Toleration, published in 1689, Locke presents a number of arguments against forced religious conformity. Two of these are of particular interest: on the one hand, Locke argues that religious faith rests outside the purview of political society—that the religious beliefs of its citizens is not the business of government; on the other hand, he argues, political power refers to physical force, and true belief simply cannot be forced."
Related Topics: John Locke, Government, Property
The Authority of a Foreign Talisman: A Study of U.S. Constitutional Practice as Authority in Nineteenth Century Argentina and the Argentine Elite's Leap of Faith, by Jonathan M. Miller, American University Law Review, Jun 1997
Examines the history of Argentine law prior to adoption of the 1853 Constitution, the arguments in Alberdi's Bases and the influence of the U.S. Constitution during the remainder of the 19th century and up to 1930
"During the debate on freedom of religion, Gutiérrez responded to conservative critics from an Alberdian perspective, arguing that it would be impossible to attract foreigners without allowing them to practice their religion. His opponents, alarmed by this aspect of the Alberdi draft, indicated that the people of their provinces were distressed by Alberdi's emphasis on religious freedom and that Catholic immigration could satisfy Argentina's needs."

Cartoons and Comic Strips

An Unholy Union, by Ann Telnaes, 24 May 2004
Tonight's Debate: Should Religion Play a Bigger Role in U.S. Government?, by Tom Toles, The Washington Post, 30 Aug 2004