Liberty to publish facts and opinion

Reference

Amendment I to the U.S. Constitution
"Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom ... of the press ..."

Articles

In Memory of the Charlie Hebdo Victims, by Sheldon Richman, 9 Jan 2015
Comments on the executions at the Charlie Hebdo newspaper and the ensuing mainstream commentary
"Countless American officials and commentators have denounced these crimes as an attack on freedom of the press and speech, which they surely were. But the Obama administration hasn't exactly been respectful of those freedoms, as its pursuit of a record number of whistleblowers and harassment of reporters demonstrate. According to Reporters Without Borders, the United States now ranks 46th in press freedom, a fall from 33rd. (The United Kingdom is 33rd and France is 39th.)"
Liberty of the Press, by James Mill, 1823
"There is another use of the freedom of the press ... If any set of men are chosen to wield the powers of government, while the people have not the means of knowing in what manner they discharge their duties, they will have the means of serving themselves at the expence of the people; and all the miseries of evil government are the certain consequence."
The Central Question, by Charley Reese, 20 Jan 2007
"Self-government only works if the people have access to the truth. If they are lied to and propagandized instead of informed, then they, in fact, live in a dictatorship, though one carefully disguised by their controllers. That's why Thomas Jefferson said that newspapers that whore for political parties or other interests are no different than newspapers controlled by a government."
The Land of the Free, by Henry Louis Mencken, 12 Jan 1925
Relates the story of Italian-American newspaper owner Carlo Tresca and his travails for daring to criticise the Italian Fascists
"The little two-line advertisement of September 8, announcing a book in Italian on birth control, showed the way. Experienced witch-hunters from the Department of Justice were rushed to New York, Tresca was indicted for advertising a means of preventing conception, and his trial was called in hot haste. ... other charges were mixed up with the complaint. One was the he had printed an article entitled 'Down With the Monarchy.' This was plainly not illegal, but the prosecution made much of it."
Related Topic: United States
John Gilmore on inflight activism, spam and sarongs, by Mikael Pawlo, GrepLaw, 18 Aug 2004
Topics discussed include: terrorism, the drug war, encryption, censorship, spam, the end-to-end principle, the right to travel, anonymity, secret FAA/TSA rules, blogs, copy protection, free software and the EFF
"Web publishing lets anybody say anything. ... Drug policy reform groups still can't buy billboard space without filing a lawsuit, but every single one of them has a web site and their audience knows where to find it. All kinds of information, from Bill Clinton's peccadillos to how British Government agents were assasinating people in Ireland, has come out despite overt or covert restrictions on prior forms of media. It is much harder for powerful people to suppress information than it was in 1990."
UpdMachiavelli and U.S. Politics, Part 4: War, by Lawrence M. Ludlow, 22 Aug 2005
Part of a six-segment series examining The Prince vis-à-vis contemporary U.S. politics; this article covers Machiavelli's simple advice on war and contrasts it with that of James Madison and Robert Higgs in Crisis and Leviathan
"With no consistent commitment to liberty, much of the press remains uncritical of constitutional violations. Instead, their chief concern is being cut off from inside sources of political gossip in retaliation for covering news stories that are critical of the administration. The specter of being frozen out of the loop is as frightening as having the government shut them down or arrest them, as Lincoln did to hundreds of newspapers and thousands of editors, legislators, and businessmen who disagreed with his policies."
Pentagon Conduits, by Sheldon Richman, 25 Apr 2008
Discusses the revelations about TV news analysts connected to the Pentagon and to military contractors
"One might think that the major news organizations would be ashamed of themselves, but we're long past that point. They have been boosters of war for many years. They, along with the major newspapers, were little more than cheerleaders during the administration's run-up to the Iraq invasion. The Times was one of the biggest offenders. Who needs state-controlled media when you have a lapdog press?"
The Authority of a Foreign Talisman: A Study of U.S. Constitutional Practice as Authority in Nineteenth Century Argentina and the Argentine Elite's Leap of Faith, by Jonathan M. Miller, American University Law Review, Jun 1997
Examines the history of Argentine law prior to adoption of the 1853 Constitution, the arguments in Alberdi's Bases and the influence of the U.S. Constitution during the remainder of the 19th century and up to 1930
"In Sistema económico, all individual liberties in the 1853 Constitution were described in terms of the contribution they make to economic growth. For example, Alberdi argued that a free press is required because the press itself is a type of industry, because it improves productive techniques by spreading knowledge, and because it acts as a watchdog 'to denounce and combat . . . the errors and abuses which hinder industry.'"
The Post Office as a Violation of Constitutional Rights, by Wendy McElroy, The Freeman, May 2001
Prompted by the announcement of the U.S. Postal Service eBillPay service (now discontinued), surveys the history of mail service vis-à-vis civil rights, from colonial days to the present
"Second, freedom of the press included—and, indeed, required—the right to privately distribute material to whoever wished to read it. A government postal monopoly would be able to ban periodicals from using virtually the only legal channels of distribution. This control constituted a direct affront to the First Amendment."

Cartoons and Comic Strips

All's Well ..., by Joel Pett, Lexington Herald-Leader, 11 Jul 2006
Non Sequitur, by Wiley Miller, 22 Aug 2004
"What happened to freedom of the press?!! "
No Peeky!, by Dwane Powell, 25 Dec 2008
Somebody Get the Lawyers Workin' on this Freedom of the Press Thing!, by Drew Sheneman
You Are Under Arrest, by Tom Toles, The Washington Post, 21 Aug 2006