Thirty-ninth President of the United States

Reference

Jimmy Carter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr. (born October 1, 1924) was the 39th President of the United States (1977-1981) and the Nobel Peace laureate in 2002. Previously, he was the Governor of Georgia (1971-1975). In 1976, Carter won the Democratic nomination as a dark horse candidate, and went on to defeat incumbent Gerald Ford in the close 1976 presidential election. ..."

Articles

Emergencies: The Breeding Ground of Tyranny, by William L. Anderson, Future of Freedom, Nov 2006
Examines the long history of "emergency powers" claimed by U.S. Presidents, including recent examples such as sanctions stemming from the International Economic Powers Act and the so-called War on Terror
"In the first year of Jimmy Carter's presidency, Congress passed the International Economic Powers Act ... in November 1979, ... Iranian students and demonstrators took over the U.S. embassy in Tehran, holding embassy personnel as hostages. (The crisis began when the Carter administration permitted the deposed shah to receive medical treatment for cancer in New York City ...) Under the authority granted in the IEPA, Carter declared economic sanctions on Iran ..."
Pentagon Whistle-Blower on the Coming War With Iran, by Karen Kwiatkowski, 27 Feb 2007
Interviewed by James Harris and Josh Scheer of Truthdig; topics include possible conflict with Iran, the Pentagon situation prior to the March 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Office of Special Plans, Vietnam, terrorism and neoconservatism
"And [Henry Jackson] was a pro, or I should say strongly anti-Communist democrat, kind of a strong defense democrat. And these guys migrated, particularly after Jimmy Carter, because Jimmy Carter, remember, what was he doing, he was trying to make peace. Remember that, somebody got a Peace Prize out of it, I don't know what it was, some kind of approach between Arabs and Israelis, and Carter was part of that. And that alienated a great many of these folks who now we know as neo-conservatives ..."
Under the Shadow of Inflationomics, by Hans F. Sennholz, Mises Daily, 1 Jun 2006
"The Carter Administration's chief economic affliction was rampant inflation and the decline of the dollar's value in relation to that of other major currencies. No matter what it did to assist the dollar, including 'massive intervention' in international currency markets, a quintupling of gold sales, and an increase in the discount rate, inflation rose in each year of the Carter Administration."